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Study: Herpes Virus May Play Role in Alzheimer's Print E-mail
Written by FHI's Week in Review   
Monday, 25 June 2018 15:27
 
Jen Christensen, in a June 21, 2018 CNN post, reports that researchers have found strong evidence to suggest that two strains of the human herpes virus -- 6A and 7 -- may contribute to the disease that robs people of their memory and cognitive functions. The research was published Thursday in the journal Neuron. Some scientists have long believed that viruses play a role in the development of Alzheimer's, according to Ms. Christensen. One of the most prominent theories is that Alzheimer's may start in the brain as a response to injury from a virus.
 
Read more in the latest issue of Week in Review>> https://conta.cc/2KjOATK
 
Last Updated on Monday, 23 July 2018 13:49
 
FL HIV/AIDS Problem Unusually Severe Print E-mail
Written by Jon Cohen | ScienceMag.org   
Thursday, 14 June 2018 00:00
 
It's a Tuesday afternoon in April, and doctors at the adult HIV/AIDS clinic at Jackson Memorial Hospitalin Miami  face their usual onslaught of patients. There's the young, recently diagnosed gay man from Venezuela here for his first appointment. An older gay man who emigrated from Colombia and has been treated at the clinic for 18 years. A 37-year-old Massachusetts native who is battling a heroin addiction, has a drug-related heart condition, and has done time for selling sex. Rounding out the queue are an undocumented grandmother from the Dominican Republic, a mentally challenged and occasionally homeless African-American woman, and an elderly Haitian woman in a wheelchair.
 
The mosaic of patients represents the major drivers of HIV's spread and the communities hard hit by AIDS in the United States. And it helps explain why in 2016, Miami had the highest new infection rate per capita of any U.S. city...
Last Updated on Friday, 15 June 2018 11:45
 
A serious new hurdle for CRISPR: Edited cells might cause cancer, two studies find Print E-mail
Written by Sharon Begley | STAT   
Tuesday, 12 June 2018 17:54
 
Editing cells' genomes with CRISPR-Cas9 might increase the risk that the altered cells, intended to treat disease, will trigger cancer, two studies published on Monday <6.11.18> warn - a potential game-changer for the companies developing CRISPR-based therapies. In the studies, published in Nature Medicine, scientists found that cells whose genomes are successfully edited by CRISPR-Cas9 have the potential to seed tumors inside a patient. That could make some CRISPR'd cells ticking time bombs, according to researchers from Sweden's Karolinska Institute and, separately, Novartis.
 
Last Updated on Tuesday, 12 June 2018 17:57
 
Trump administration wants to gut pre-existing condition protections, putting GOP candidates in a bad spot Print E-mail
Written by FHI's Week in Review   
Monday, 11 June 2018 13:44
 
Mike Stankiewicz, in a Jun 8, 2018 Fierce Healthcare post, reports that the Department of Justice said this week it mostly agrees with a lawsuit (filed by 20 Republican states leaders) that claims the Affordable Care Act's individual mandate is unconstitutional since the GOP zeroed out its penalty last year. The Trump administration also said that pre-existing condition protections within the law were inseparable from the mandate and must be struck down as well, according to the author.
 
Read more in the current issue of Week in Review>> https://conta.cc/2JDU7nT
 
Last Updated on Monday, 02 July 2018 16:29
 
We could reverse aging by removing wrinkles inside our cells, study suggests Print E-mail
Written by Medical Xpress   
Tuesday, 29 May 2018 17:55
 
A new discovery about the effects of aging in our cells could allow doctors to cure or prevent diabetes, fatty liver disease and other metabolic diseases-and possibly even turn back the clock on aging itself. The new finding from the University of Virginia School of Medicine suggests that fatty liver disease and other unwanted effects of aging may be the result of our cells' nuclei-the compartment containing our DNA-getting wrinkly. Those wrinkles appear to prevent our genes from functioning properly, the UVA researchers found. There's no wrinkle cream for nuclear membranes, but there is a tantalizing possibility: We might use viruses to smooth the membranes' surfaces-and restore the cells to functioning as they did in the glow of youth.

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Last Updated on Monday, 04 June 2018 17:40
 
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